Category Archives: Articles

General Saxophone related articles, opinions, questions, etc, etc

Best Blogs I Followed In 2014

Wow, 2014 is over already. Luckily, I spent some of 2014 reading some blogs that I find interesting.

  • Best. Saxophone. Website. Ever. This site generally has good articles posted on it, though lately there are other authors posting. And the quality of the articles is a little questionable (like the “Introducing the Most Unique Sax Tone Development Device on the Market).
  • Bill Plake Music. Great articles here. You should follow the site.
  • Bobby Stern Jazz. If I had to rank my favorite sites, this would be #1. Bobby posts AWESOME exercises, transcriptions, and articles.
  • Bret Pimentel posts great, insightful articles.
  • Matt Otto Good free things to work on. Glad he stopped charing $.99 for his sheets on Scribd
  • Jazz Advice. I think every article they have put out is great. If anything, everyone should read every article here.
  • Bulletproof Musician. Like the above site, every one of the articles is great. Go read them. Now.
  • Casa Valdez Studios. He hasn’t been posting much, but when he does, you need to read it. Good stuff.

Yet Another “Vintage Meyer” Clone

Seems every year, we have another “this is THE vintage Meyer copy” mouthpiece. Here is a review of D’Addario’s latest attempt.

As an owner of a vintage Meyer Brother’s alto mouthpiece, a 4 that was opened up to a 6 by the late great Jon Van Wie, I have never found a mouthpiece like it. Not to say that there are not great mouthpieces out there, there are PLENTY of excellent mouthpieces being made today. They just lack the “character” of a vintage Meyer Brothers piece.

Lenny Pickett Seminar

Came across this on Youtube. Lenny is one of my favorite saxophonists. Very interesting lecture.

Click article for more parts
Continue reading Lenny Pickett Seminar

Review: Gruv Gear V Solo

There comes a time when you just can’t carry all your stuff to the gig. Your tenor….and soprano…..and flute…..and stands…..and a music stand…..and a microphone stand. It’s a lot of stuff. Then you have to walk a good mile because the parking for the venue sucks balls and you are about a mile from where you want to be.

So, you decide it is time to get a cart. But what sorta cart? There are tons. Something multi-purpose, where it can be a dolly (hand truck), a cart, and maybe something inbetween. Then what you want is a Gruv Gear V Solo. It is a stylish, sturdy (holds 500lbs), and compact cart that can easily hold all your horns. Consider it.
2014-09-20 17.59.19

SaxophoneCommunity.com to Shutter

Not sure when SaxophoneCommunity.com launched, but it was recent. And now it’s ending due to lack of funds. Go figure. In fact, in the email sent out to it’s members, they only ever made $30 in donations from 2010 to 2014. That is sad.

I think what really killed it was lack of good content. What I have seen over there were shoddy “transcriptions” or “arrangements” songs. And they were peddling subscriptions at $50 a year for them? Say what? You could get a better transcription of mostly the same songs (or better songs) here for nothing.

As probably the longest running saxophone site on the net (check archive.org, we were up and running way back in May of 1999….that sax on the something didn’t start until November of 2001), it’s really hard to make money running a site unless you are putting out lessons and/or other high quality material(s) like Steve Neff and Bob Reyonlds. Producing that stuff takes a LOT OF TIME, especially all those books Steve Neff does. Hours and hours of tedious work. I have a tough time trying to get a sheet of the week out, but these doods do videos and books?!? Where does one have time for this?

It was a good idea, saxophonecommunity, but it was trying to be an upscale Sax on the something site. Not sure why we needed another one of those.

The Story Of Tina Brooks

If you have never heard Tina Brooks, check him out. A saxophonist who should have been synonymous with names like Joe Henderson, Stanely Turrentine, etc.

Here is his story:

He was 28 when he made the record, and you might have thought, if you didn’t know better, that he was well on his way to an influential career in the jazz forefront. Then comes the sobering thought— when Tina Brooks recorded The Waiting Game in 1961, his career was effectively finished. The record date fell five days before his 29th birthday, but he never recorded again. He would live 13 more years, but neither The Waiting Game nor any of the other music of his mature years was released in his lifetime. He died at 42, a bitter, penniless, incapacitated wreck, but he was he was given up for dead years before that.

Science Shows How Guitar Player’s Brains Are Actually Different

This is an interesting article:

For starters, guitarists literally have the ability to synchronize their brains while playing. In a 2012 study in Berlin, researchers had 12 pairs of guitarists play the same piece of music while having their brains scanned. They discovered that the guitarists’ neural networks would synchronize not only during the piece, but even slightly before playing. So, basically, guitarists can read each others’ minds better than they can read music.
That synch happens in the areas of the brain that deal with music production and social cognition, so it makes a real difference in how tight a band sounds. When people talk about a band’s chemistry, this may well be what they’re seeing. It also explains why brothers are the core duo in so many famous rock bands.

Wow, seems Guitarists have brains ;-). Next they will say Drummers have brains too…….

Scale Omnibus

Go and download this now the scale omnibus.

The Scale Omnibus is a FREE book that describes as many as 392 distinct scales in all 12 keys,with synonyms,historical notes,chords over which the scale sounds well,summary tables,and more. It took hours of researching,typing,read-proofing,and double-checking and might easily be the most complete book on this topic.

One Of Coltrane’s Saxophone Donated

Seems Ravi had three of them. This one was the one used on A Love Supreme.

Today, the museum kicked off its 13th annual Jazz Appreciation Month by celebrating A Love Supreme’s 50th anniversary. And in honor of the occasion, Ravi Coltrane, himself an accomplished contemporary jazz musician, donated one of his father’s three principal saxophones—a Mark VI tenor crafted by Henri Selmer Paris, a manufacturer of high-quality brass and woodwind instruments. The saxophone was made in 1965, the same year in which the recording of A Love Supreme was issued. “Every time I open the case to look at the saxophone,” said John Edward Hasse, curator of American music, who presided over its donation ceremony, “I get goosebumps. John…Coltrane’s….saxophone.”