July 23, 2024

I’m not sure what to think about this. Selmer, I gotta ask, why?

Conn-Selmer, Inc. announces the U.S. availability of the limited edition 2006 issue Selmer (Paris) saxophone avian series. In 2005, the Henri Selmer company of Paris embarked on a five-year adventure honoring each of the continents by depicting a native bird in highly detailed hand crafted engraving on its new Reference Series saxophones. Last year’s edition featured the hummingbird of the North American continent. For 2006, Selmer (Paris) has selected the kookaburra bird from the Australian continent. Selmer Paris “bird” models are based on the popular Reference 54 Series saxophones, capturing the essence of the famous Mark VI instruments made in the 1950s and 1960s. Selmer Paris will produce 330 of the standard edition kookaburra alto saxophones for the United States and Canada. The standard kookaburra will feature deluxe hand engraving on the bell, along with a unique case.

Oh, and they have a Flamingo one as well. Personally, I’m holding out for the Lisa Simpson limited edition Selmer Reference series sax for 2008. And the Peter Griffin limited edition Selmer Reference sax for 2009. Oh, and the Bevis and Butthead series in 2010. Why not just offer to engrave a reference series with whatever image you want for an extra $500 or so?

8 thoughts on “Selmer – What Are They Thinking?!?!

  1. “Why not just offer to engrave a reference series with whatever image you want for an extra $500 or so?”

    Given today’s etching techologies where I am nearly certain all the etching is done by computer anyway I really don’t see why it would need to cost even this much; a $100 option would probably cover the bother of inserting your own TIFF into the engraving machine and effectively giving the horn a ‘name’ like the way medieval knights and samurai named their swords — just think what this would do for the eBay value of each horn!

  2. Seriously. I think instead of doing these lame birds from around the world thing, they should sell blank reference series horns. You go to your store, try out whatever horn you like (cuz we all know every horn plays different), then for a price, say $200, they will ship it to Selmer to have art work put on it. Of course, you’d get to design it using some sort of in store design program.

  3. How about: click on a button on the Selmer (or any brand) and they send you a tested saxophone that plays well. Give us a choice between classical (dark) or Jazz/contemp. and the price may go down because they make ony 2 models. Next have a choice of 50 engraving styles and any word (s) you want with a limit of digets and spaces and for the same 5 grand you can plug it inti any AC jack and it keeps you warm at night. Also every hour it whispers your name in a soft voice so not to wake my wife.

  4. How about: click on a button on the Selmer (or any brand) and they send you a tested saxophone that plays well. Give us a choice between classical (dark) or Jazz/contemp. and the price may go down because they make ony 2 models. Next have a choice of 50 engraving styles and any word (s) you want with a limit of digets and spaces and for the same 5 grand you can plug it inti any AC jack and it keeps you warm at night. Also every hour it whispers your name in a soft voice so not to wake my wife.

    You might be on to something there…..perhaps a model that practices by itself if you happen to forget?

    I think Selmer really has too many freakin choices. They should have three models, a beginner, an intermediate, and a Pro. You can customize them however you want, engraving, etc, etc for an additional fee.

  5. They really do have a bunch of pro models. The crazy part is when a student shows you the lame description of the Tenors for example. One is supposed to bring back the sound of the Mark VI?? I have played several MK VI horns in my day ( 56 yrs old) and they all sound different. The series I was lame I owned one (for 7 yrs) the series II was better the III has a gizmo opens a key Ref 56 ref 36 Selmer should put some demos on a web site! It’s 2008 already and I can’t tell a student what to buy (in Tenors) The Selmer Paris people hate the amer and brits so much that they will not write some text that describes the sound! But Cannonball can do all this (I play a 85,xxx mk vI ) I can not hear a diff bet a Cannonball and a Selmer II anymore .. in the dark a Yani feels and plays like a Selmer also and those Yama 62Z ?? I want one just from reading the wwbw catalog … some one should have a web like the mouthpiece guy in japan. So what is the difference between all the Selmer Pro Models? Selmer will take the english answer to their demise.

  6. Seriously, any of you ever played one of these? Seriously yeah theres a big stupid bird on it. But really these horns play like a wet dream. I don’t have the privilege of owning one, but I work in a music store, I’ve played a half dozen assorted bird series (kook’s ltd and std, hummingbrds same deal and the flamingo alto)and these saxophones are BEYOND reproach. As for these not being as good as a VI, that all depends on what you’re after. If you want a squirrely out of tune vintage horn that eevryone and their dog owns/has played go for it and be happy. But really if you want a new saxophone, with gorious dark tone, Easy playing, good response, no F# and has a remarkable pedigree. Play this horn. Or if you can’t handle the fact that to play probably the best manufatuerer created horn in a long time you have to hand out some money. Don’t. Continue staring forums making fun of something you’ll never hope to play let alone do justice.

    And you want a rundown of the sounsd of all the horns that selmer produces cause you can’t be bothered to go play test and figure it out?
    Let me run it down for you, ready? BETTER THEN CANNONBALL. Unless you want to sound like an overly edgy, made of old tanks non-responsive made in a sweatshop piece of crap…in which case I guess cannonball fits the bill.
    Seriously though, the series II has a little it more lively tone, its very open and slightly birghter then the series II. The Series III is truely a dark horn, very centered, not mellow, but relaxed. The reference 54 keeps a lot of this tone quality but adds a little more edge to the tone. The reference 36 (tenor only) is a little bit of a harder blow, but a very rewarding bright open tone, not spread but a little broader it feels then the 54.
    As for the Yamaha’s the 875EX is a very centered reserved horn, and does an excellent jog reproducing the classic Rascher tone. The 82(not 62…)Z horn is a brighter more edgy and lively tone (especially the unlaqucered), and though I currently play one I just don’t think that it holds up to any of the reference series horns, and especially not to the “Bird” series.

    In the end if you don’t like the birds and think that making a tribute to Charlie Parker is overly commercial, thats up to you. I sure don’t have a problem closing my eye’s when I play and just enjoying a saxophone that works with me.

  7. Seriously, any of you ever played one of these? Seriously yeah theres a big stupid bird on it. But really these horns play like a wet dream. I don’t have the privilege of owning one, but I work in a music store, I’ve played a half dozen assorted bird series (kook’s ltd and std, hummingbrds same deal and the flamingo alto)and these saxophones are BEYOND reproach.

    Supposedly there are like 200 of these made. So, you’ve played a half a dozen? Wow. I think the chances of that happening are like seeing BigFoot, Yeti, and a UFO landing at the same time.

    As for these not being as good as a VI, that all depends on what you’re after. If you want a squirrely out of tune vintage horn that eevryone and their dog owns/has played go for it and be happy. But really if you want a new saxophone, with gorious dark tone, Easy playing, good response, no F# and has a remarkable pedigree. Play this horn. Or if you can’t handle the fact that to play probably the best manufatuerer created horn in a long time you have to hand out some money. Don’t. Continue staring forums making fun of something you’ll never hope to play let alone do justice.

    Again, the likely hood of ever seeing one is like seeing Bigfoot. Sure, people have SAID they have seen him/it, but there is no scientific proof. And, the Selmer thing, how many stores actually have one of the Bird ones? I’m pretty none of the stores in my area have it, and this is the Bay Area.

    And you want a rundown of the sounsd of all the horns that selmer produces cause you can’t be bothered to go play test and figure it out?

    Yes, we do, cause it’s like winning the Lotto or something. The odds of someone actually being at the right place at the right time is astronomical.

    Let me run it down for you, ready? BETTER THEN CANNONBALL. Unless you want to sound like an overly edgy, made of old tanks non-responsive made in a sweatshop piece of crap…in which case I guess cannonball fits the bill.

    Ah, now we have some evidence. I really don’t care for the Cannonball Saxes.

    Seriously though, the series II has a little it more lively tone, its very open and slightly birghter then the series II. The Series III is truely a dark horn, very centered, not mellow, but relaxed. The reference 54 keeps a lot of this tone quality but adds a little more edge to the tone. The reference 36 (tenor only) is a little bit of a harder blow, but a very rewarding bright open tone, not spread but a little broader it feels then the 54.

    Excellent info there. Finally! Now, does Yeti like meat or is it a plant eater? Is it really white?

    As for the Yamaha’s the 875EX is a very centered reserved horn, and does an excellent jog reproducing the classic Rascher tone. The 82(not 62…)Z horn is a brighter more edgy and lively tone (especially the unlaqucered), and though I currently play one I just don’t think that it holds up to any of the reference series horns, and especially not to the “Bird” series.

    Hmm, I have a student that has, I think, the 82 tenor. I thought it was rather nice, though didn’t have the sound of my Mark VI though…..

    In the end if you don’t like the birds and think that making a tribute to Charlie Parker is overly commercial, thats up to you. I sure don’t have a problem closing my eye’s when I play and just enjoying a saxophone that works with me.

    And chicks did the birds. True enough about whatever works. I just think Selmer needs to cut down the number of brands/lines it has. I received the latest WWBW catalog, and there are like 6 something Selmer brands now? What?

  8. Steve, you obviously know what you are talking about. I am in the process of looking for an advanced instrument for my kid and don’t want to look too stupid but I have a stupid question. On the birds why does it cost more to not have an F# key and why would you want one or not. Also they give you a choice of different mouthpieces (Choice of D, E or F lay) and how would I figure out which one to use for different playing. He is very good (all state his freshman year and his teacher insists that he needs an instrument of this type) He has not enjoyed playing jazz so a mouthpiece that is specifically desighed for jazz isn’t right for him. Thanks for your help

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